What’s All the Ruckus About? – John 10:17-18 04/17/2022

What’s All the Ruckus About? – John 10:17-18 04/17/2022


We have now arrived at the cross… and beyond, and we need to recognize how easily we misunderstand what we see or what we hear. We blend things together, and before you know it we’re celebrating Easter Bunnies and chocolate eggs. Now don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with chocolate eggs! But that is not what we’re celebrating this morning.


Although our society commonly calls today, “Easter,” that is incorrect. What Christians celebrate is not Easter, we are celebrating Resurrection Sunday. We are celebrating an event that changed everything, Jesus rose from the dead. But… do we understand why that matters?

We have two closely related events taking place within three days of each other. Jesus died, and Jesus rose from the dead. Paul puts it this way in 1 Corinthians 15:3-4 ~


3 For I delivered to you first of all that which I also received: that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, 4 and that He was buried, and that He rose again the third day according to the Scriptures,…[1]


All four Gospels record these two events. But… why does that matter? That’s what we’ll be exploring today. To do this, the text that we’ll be examining is Romans 4:23-25 ~

23 Now it was not written for his sake alone that it was imputed to him, 24 but also for us. It shall be imputed to us who believe in Him who raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead, 25 who was delivered up because of our offenses, and was raised because of our justification.[2]


Here we find Paul using Abraham as a pattern and type that looks forward to the faith that would be practiced by Christians.[3] We should note how Paul defines “faith” (πιστευουσιν)[4] [pĭs tūʹ ŏū sĭn] in this example; faith is identified as confidence in the utter trustworthiness of God’s promises.[5] That’s it, period. In our culture we tend to see faith as wishful thinking. The concept gets unclear and nebulous as we try to define it. Paul has none of those kinds of problems. The kind of faith Paul is talking about is believing God when He says He’ll do something. Abraham believed God had the desire and ability to do what He promised, and trusted Him to do so. That is a perfectly reasonable belief.


Note that Paul says righteousness will be imputed to anyone who believes in Him who raised Jesus from the dead.[6] Although there are eternal implications, the presumption is that “credited to his account”[7] (λογίζεσθαι) takes place the moment we place our faith in God’s faithfulness expressed through Jesus Christ.[8]


But we have a problem. Our offence, sin, is a violation of the holy nature of God. It is willful rebellion. To address this, Jesus was delivered up to die as a sacrifice for sin.[9] That, by the way, was not a mistake. His death was the fulfillment of what the law of the sin-offering presaged on the Day of Atonement.[10] That was the day set aside to atone for the sins of the Israelites recorded in Leviticus 23:26-28.


The purpose of atonement is to mend the break in relationship between God and humanity that’s caused by our sin.[11] The value, the power, the redemption, that comes is applied to us personally as we respond in faith. Remember, faith is simply believing that God will do what He said He will do. Because of faith, each Christian is included as God’s child and will be joint participants in the resurrection of the dead.[12] To accomplish that, God had to do something that we would not expect. He became the atoning sacrifice through Jesus.


The text says Jesus was “delivered,” the word is (παρεδοθη)[13] [par ĕ doʹ thā], and is used to describe casting someone into prison or delivering over for justice to be done.[14] Here it refers to the judicial act of God the Father delivering God the Son over to receive the just punishment He did not deserve, but that we do.[15] This is the culmination of Jesus’ mission, our justification.[16]


Sacrificial atonement for sin, the restoration of good relations between the individual who trusts in Jesus and God, was accomplished through the death of Christ.[17] What we find in our text is a statement regarding the vicarious nature of Jesus’ suffering in in our place.[18] He had a preordained role, as the Servant of Yahweh, to take away our sin and purchase justification for those who will trust in Him.[19]


Then we come across the word, “justification,” which is a reference to God, acting as Judge, declaring that we are no longer answerable for our sins (that is, the offences we’ve committed against Him). The reason for that is Jesus received the full extent of the punishment we deserved when He died on that Roman cross some 2000 years ago.


Then, Jesus’ resurrection is the divine assurance that He has, once and for all, dealt with our sin problem.[20] The sign that God approves and accepts that sacrifice was affirmed through Jesus’ resurrection.[21] This is a demonstration, through Jesus rising from the dead, of His incarnate life and glory.[22] The link between justification and Jesus’ resurrection underscores the point that the justifying grace of God is not to be understood apart from His creative, life-giving power.[23]


All of this comes back to the question, why does Jesus’ death and resurrection matter? It matters because it purchased our pardons, and as a result we stand accepted, even cherished, by a holy God. That, well that changes the way we face everything that’s allowed into our lives. As the commercials tend to say, “This changes everything!”

[1] The New King James Version (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1982), 1 Co 15:3–4. [2] The New King James Version (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1982), Ro 4:23–25. [3] James D. G. Dunn, Romans 1–8, vol. 38A, Word Biblical Commentary (Dallas: Word, Incorporated, 1988), 222. [4]Thomas Newberry and George Ricker Berry, The Interlinear Literal Translation of the Greek New Testament (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2004), Ro 4:24. [5] Robert H. Mounce, Romans, vol. 27, The New American Commentary (Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1995), 128. [6] Kenneth Boa and William Kruidenier, Romans, vol. 6, Holman New Testament Commentary (Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2000), 138. [7] Johannes P. Louw and Eugene Albert Nida, Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament: Based on Semantic Domains (New York: United Bible Societies, 1996), 582. [8] James D. G. Dunn, Romans 1–8, vol. 38A, Word Biblical Commentary (Dallas: Word, Incorporated, 1988), 223. [9] Robert H. Mounce, Romans, vol. 27, The New American Commentary (Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1995), 131. [10] James D. G. Dunn, Romans 1–8, vol. 38A, Word Biblical Commentary (Dallas: Word, Incorporated, 1988), 225. [11] J. Rodman Williams, Renewal Theology Volume One: God, the World, and Redemption, in Renewal Theology: Systematic Theology from a Charismatic Perspective, Three Volumes in One, (Zondervan, Grand Rapids, MI.: 1996), 353. [12] Joseph A. Fitzmyer S.J., Romans: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary, vol. 33, Anchor Yale Bible (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2008), 388. [13]Thomas Newberry and George Ricker Berry, The Interlinear Literal Translation of the Greek New Testament (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2004), Ro 4:25. [14] Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 2 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 73. [15] Kenneth S. Wuest, Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader, vol. 2 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997), 73. [16] Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown, Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible, vol. 2 (Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997), 230. [17] Kenneth Boa and William Kruidenier, Romans, vol. 6, Holman New Testament Commentary (Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2000), 139. [18] Joseph A. Fitzmyer S.J., Romans: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary, vol. 33, Anchor Yale Bible (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2008), 389. [19] Joseph A. Fitzmyer S.J., Romans: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary, vol. 33, Anchor Yale Bible (New Haven; London: Yale University Press, 2008), 389. [20] Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown, Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible, vol. 2 (Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997), 230. [21] Kenneth Boa and William Kruidenier, Romans, vol. 6, Holman New Testament Commentary (Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2000), 139. [22] Marvin Richardson Vincent, Word Studies in the New Testament, vol. 3 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1887), 57. [23] James D. G. Dunn, Romans 1–8, vol. 38A, Word Biblical Commentary (Dallas: Word, Incorporated, 1988), 241.

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