Savior and King

Savior and King – Hebrews 10:12-13        12/23/2019 As we conclude our study of the incarnation, we’ll look at it today through the lens of Jesus as Savior and King.  What we find is that this God-man, who made salvation possible, rules right now and will rule forever.  It is only as God who became man, while remaining both fully divine and fully human, that Jesus is capable of being both our Savior and our King.  It is in Christ’s death for our sins that we’re now reconciled to a righteous God.[1]  Jesus endured the curse that humanity is under and received divine judgment on our behalf.[2]  But His work did not end there, He freed us from the bondage we had placed ourselves under.[3]  This was all accomplished through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. Our text today is Hebrews 10:12-13.  Here we see that Jesus sat down, symbolically indicating that His work is complete and there was nothing else that needed to be done.[4]  The idea is that of both a finished work and receiving the highest dignity and honor.[5]  He has offered the only possible sacrifice of obedience that could do away with sin.[6]  Jesus now sits because his sacrifice requires no repetition.[7]  The one sacrifice Jesus made accomplished what the multiple sacrifices of the Levitical system failed to do.[8]  Therefore, the sacrificial phase of His priestly ministry is now done for all time.[9] Where He waits is significant, it is at the right hand of God.[10]  This position has not been usurped by Jesus, the Father invited Jesus to take this place as the only One worthy of it.[11]  It is at the right hand of the Father that Jesus now waits until the day that He will judge those who reject Him.[12]  For now, He waits until the full number of those who will be saved is complete,[13] and we wait along with Him. The fact that Jesus waits for his enemies to be subdued does not imply that He’s inactive.[14]  Jesus does, indeed, have a continuing ministry.[15]  He intercedes on our behalf to the Father.[16]  But these intercessory prayers are made based on the power of the sacrifice already completed, and they are made from a position of authority and honor.[17]  His ministry has gone from the shame of the cross to the exalted place of highest honor in glory in the heavenly realms.[18]  Now He awaits the day when all of His enemies are humbled before Him. Jesus Christ is, in fact, the true King, first to those who claim Him as Savior and Lord, but ultimately all sentient beings will acknowledge Jesus’ unchallenged rule.[19]  During His first advent Jesus was clear that He had not come to rule… and He consistently resisted any impression that He was coming to establish an earthly kingdom.[20]  But there is a time coming… The final subjection of His foes will be accomplished at Jesus’ second coming.[21]  When Jesus returns He will be found victorious over every enemy and He will establish His physical, literal, righteous, kingdom on earth.[22]  For those who have trusted in Him, there will be no reason to fear.  Through the work of their King in their lives they will have been “perfected forever’ in Him.[23] This can sound as if there’s nothing required of us right now while we wait for the culmination of all this.  The truth is it would be difficult to find anything less true.  The reality of Christ’s reign, for the Christian, has already begun.  Now, most of us are perfectly happy to accept Jesus as our Savior.  But if the reality that Jesus as Savior is personal to you, the reality that Jesus is King must also be personal to you.  Jesus has no illusions about who He is and the honor and obedience He is due. The reign of Christ, is before anything else, over the individual lives of His followers.[24]  I’m afraid it’s a package deal, you cannot have a Savior without also having a Lord.  Jesus Christ is both Savior and Lord, He redeems from sin and delivers us from destructive bondage to this world system and its rulers, but to do this requires He establish a new ruler, and that would be Himself. This is about a new quality of life, a supernatural life that reflects the reality of Christ in you.  It reflects the life of Jesus Christ living through you, empowering you as His Spirit moves, directs, and transforms you.  So long as we fill our lives with trying to make Jesus our Savior and King, doing our best to do our best, we will never enter into His rest.[25]  We’ll just set up a bunch of new laws to try to live by, and fail, and judge each other for not doing what we can’t do either.  Our striving means we’re still sitting on the throne that belongs to Jesus.  Whatever we do that does not flow out of our total dependence on Jesus Christ and the resources He provides through His Holy Spirit can only be called one thing, “sin.”[26]

[1] J. Rodman Williams, Renewal Theology, Volume One: God, the World, and Redemption, in Renewal Theology: Systematic Theology form a Charismatic Perspective, Three Volumes in One, (Zondervan, Grand Rapides, MI.: 1996), 357.

[2] J. Rodman Williams, Renewal Theology, Volume One: God, the World, and Redemption, in Renewal Theology: Systematic Theology form a Charismatic Perspective, Three Volumes in One, (Zondervan, Grand Rapides, MI.: 1996), 361.

[3] J. Rodman Williams, Renewal Theology, Volume One: God, the World, and Redemption, in Renewal Theology: Systematic Theology form a Charismatic Perspective, Three Volumes in One, (Zondervan, Grand Rapides, MI.: 1996), 361.

[4] J. Vernon McGee, Thru the Bible with J. Vernon McGee: Volume V, 1 Corinthians – Revelation, (Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, TN.: 1983), 573.

[5] Leon Morris, Hebrews, in The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Volume 12, Hebrews – Revelation, gen. ed., Frank Gaebelein, assoc. ed., J.D. Douglas, NT eds., James Boice and Merrill Tenney, manuscript eds., Richard Polcyn and Gerard Terpstra, (Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, MI.: 1981), 101.

[6] Gareth Cockerill, Hebrews: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition, gen. publisher, Nathan Birky, gen. ed., Ray Barnwell, snr. ed., David Higle, managing ed., Russell Gunsalus, ed., Kelly Trennepohl, (Wesleyan Publishing House, Indianapolis, IN.: 1999), 203.

[7] William L. Lane, Hebrews 9–13, vol. 47B, Word Biblical Commentary (Dallas: Word, Incorporated, 1991), 267.

[8] A.T. Robertson, Word Pictures in the New Testament (Nashville, TN: Broadman Press, 1933), Heb 10:12.

[9] William L. Lane, Hebrews 9–13, vol. 47B, Word Biblical Commentary (Dallas: Word, Incorporated, 1991), 267.

[10] Gareth Cockerill, Hebrews: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition, gen. publisher, Nathan Birky, gen. ed., Ray Barnwell, snr. ed., David Higle, managing ed., Russell Gunsalus, ed., Kelly Trennepohl, (Wesleyan Publishing House, Indianapolis, IN.: 1999), 204.

[11] Gareth Cockerill, Hebrews: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition, gen. publisher, Nathan Birky, gen. ed., Ray Barnwell, snr. ed., David Higle, managing ed., Russell Gunsalus, ed., Kelly Trennepohl, (Wesleyan Publishing House, Indianapolis, IN.: 1999), 204.

[12] Gareth Cockerill, Hebrews: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition, gen. publisher, Nathan Birky, gen. ed., Ray Barnwell, snr. ed., David Higle, managing ed., Russell Gunsalus, ed., Kelly Trennepohl, (Wesleyan Publishing House, Indianapolis, IN.: 1999), 205.

[13] J. Vernon McGee, Thru the Bible with J. Vernon McGee: Volume V, 1 Corinthians – Revelation, (Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, TN.: 1983), 573.

[14] William L. Lane, Hebrews 9–13, vol. 47B, Word Biblical Commentary (Dallas: Word, Incorporated, 1991), 267.

[15] F.F. Bruce, The Epistle to the Hebrews, Revised, The New International Commentary on the New Testament, gen. ed., Gordon Fee, (William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, MI.: 1990), 245.

[16] F.F. Bruce, The Epistle to the Hebrews, Revised, The New International Commentary on the New Testament, gen. ed., Gordon Fee, (William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, MI.: 1990), 245.

[17] F.F. Bruce, The Epistle to the Hebrews, Revised, The New International Commentary on the New Testament, gen. ed., Gordon Fee, (William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, MI.: 1990), 245.

[18] F.F. Bruce, The Epistle to the Hebrews, Revised, The New International Commentary on the New Testament, gen. ed., Gordon Fee, (William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, MI.: 1990), 246.

[19] Wayne Grudem, Systematic theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine, (Zondervan, Grand Rapids, MI.: 1994), 628.

[20] Wayne Grudem, Systematic theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine, (Zondervan, Grand Rapids, MI.: 1994), 628.

[21] Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown, Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible, vol. 2 (Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997), 467.

[22] Warren W. Wiersbe, The Bible Exposition Commentary, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996), 314.

[23] Warren W. Wiersbe, The Bible Exposition Commentary, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996), 314.

[24] J. Rodman Williams, Renewal Theology, Volume One: God, the World, and Redemption, in Renewal Theology: Systematic Theology form a Charismatic Perspective, Three Volumes in One, (Zondervan, Grand Rapides, MI.: 1996), 408.

[25] W. Ian Thomas, The Indwelling Life of Christ: All of Him in all of Me, (Multnomah Books, Colorado Springs, CO.: 2006), 31.

[26] W. Ian Thomas, The Indwelling Life of Christ: All of Him in all of Me, (Multnomah Books, Colorado Springs, CO.: 2006), 33.

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